iWatch



WHAT IS iWATCH?

iWatch is an antiterrorism program that focuses on encouraging Army in Europe wide awareness efforts to keep our communities safe. You and your fellow community members can report behaviors and activities that do not look right (suspicious behavior). It is a program and partnership between the communities and local law enforcement. iWatch asks you to report behavior and activities that are unusual or seem out of the ordinary.

Have a report to make? Submit one to your local law enforcement officials below.


Make an iWatch Report

You should make a report to law enforcement if you observe suspicious activities such as a hole cut in a fence, unauthorized photography, etc.


Do crimes really happen on post?

Suspicious activity can be observed both on and off post, which is why it's so important to know the people who live around you -- you can work together to protect each other.

Why should I report?

It is your reports of suspicious activity reported to the local law enforcement that can help predict and prevent attacks. Security professionals cannot be everywhere, and need alert community member reports. It is always better to report suspicious behaviors than to refrain from doing so. The iWatch program is about unusual, out of the ordinary behaviors and activities, not individuals.

A simple observation, a single report can lead to actions that may stop a terrorist attack. That is the power of iWatch.

What should I report?

Below are some examples of behaviors and activities to report. Trust your instincts. If a behavior or activity makes you feel uncomfortable, report it!

  • People drawing or measuring government or high occupant buildings.
  • Strangers asking questions about security forces or security procedures.
  • Briefcases, suitcases, backpacks or packages left unattended.
  • Cars or trucks parked in No Parking Zones in front of government or high occupant facilities.
  • Unauthorized person found in secure areas.
  • A person wearing clothes that are too big and bulky and/or too hot for the weather.
  • Unusual chemical smells or fumes.
  • People asking questions about sensitive information such as building designs, security plans, or VIP travel schedules without really having a need to know.
  • Purchasing supplies or equipment that can be used to make bombs or weapons or purchasing uniforms without having a legal need.

Contact your unit/garrison antiterrorism officer to learn more about the iWatch program. The annual antiterrorism awareness training also provides additional information on suspicious behaviors and activities.

What is an Active Shooter?

Active shooters are individuals who attempt to kill people in confined and populated areas, often displaying no pattern in their selection of victims. It is not an uncommon terrorist tactic. Active shooter situations tend to be unpredictable and evolve quickly, often before law enforcement personnel arrive.

What are some tips for survival during an Active Shooter incident?

  • Evacuate and have an escape route and plan in mind.
  • Leave your belongings behind.
  • If evacuation is not possible, find a place where the active shooter is less likely to find you (office with door, furniture to block the door or hide behind large items).
  • Be out of the active shooter’s view, do not trap or restrict your options for movement.
  • Crouch to avoid Ricocheting bullets.
  • If in an office or room lock the door and silence your cell phone.
  • Keep your hands visible when security personnel arrive.
  • Evacuate in the direction first responders are entering.
  • Follow the instructions of security personnel.

What is an Insider Threat?

An insider threat can be an employee or student who has the ability to penetrate existing security. Their success is measured by deliberate or inadvertent acts of theft of hardware, software, organizational equipment, government property or posses the ability to carry out acts of terrorism.

What are the early recognitions of a threat that can prevent an incident?

  • Anti-American statements asserting that US policy and authority is illegitimate
  • Aggression or threats toward coworkers
  • Presence of unauthorized weapons
  • Attempts to communicate with U.S. enemies
  • Abnormal mood swings or depression, withdrawn behavior, decrease in hygiene, suicidal remarks, paranoia
  • Unfounded allegations of US persecution or prejudice against a minority group or religion

MOBILE REPORTING

           

You can now report suspicious events via mobile apps running the Android or Microsoft mobile operating systems.

RELATED LINKS

STAY CONNECTED

Like U.S. Army Europe Antiterrorism and Force Protection on Facebook for information on potential incidents, up-to-date guidance and general tips on keeping you and your family safe.