‘Bayonets,’ Baumholder honored during 170th IBCT deactivation ceremony

Oct. 11, 2012

By U.S. Army Europe Public Affairs


  • ‘Bayonets’, Baumholder honored during 170th IBCT deactivation ceremony

    The 170th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Commander Col. Mark Raschke and Command Sgt. Maj. James Ackermann John case their brigade's colors during a deactivation ceremony, held in Baumholder, Germany, Oct. 9.(U.S. Army Photo by Staff. Sgt. Brooks Fletcher, U.S. Army Europe Public Affairs)

  • ‘Bayonets’, Baumholder honored during 170th IBCT deactivation ceremony

    Col. Mark Raschke performs his final salute as the 170th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Commander and concludes the brigade's deactivation ceremony, held in Baumholder, Germany, Oct. 9. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff. Sgt. Brooks Fletcher, U.S. Army Europe Public Affairs)

  • ‘Bayonets’, Baumholder honored during 170th IBCT deactivation ceremony

    Soldiers from 170th Infantry Brigade Combat Team stand in formation during the brigade's deactivation ceremony, held in Baumholder, Germany, Oct. 9. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff. Sgt. Brooks Fletcher, U.S. Army Europe Public Affairs)

BAUMHOLDER, Germany -- The 170th Infantry Brigade Combat Team deactivated in a ceremony at Smith Barracks in Baumholder, Germany, Oct. 9, the first of a number of actions the U.S. Army in Europe as part of its transformation.

“The U.S. Army and Baumholder community have a rich history and this ceremony simply highlights the latest transition, of many, that have occurred,” said 170th IBCT Commander, Col. Mark Raschke.

U.S. Army Europe Commanding General, Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling added that the 170th IBCT’s deactivation ended 50 years of combat units being stationed in Baumholder.

During the ceremony, the brigade cased its colors and, its component battalions received meritorious unit commendations for their service during their deployment to Afghanistan from February 2011 through February 2012.

The success of the 170th IBCT “Bayonet” Brigade, was a direct reflection of the support from the local community, said Hertling.

“The German Baumholder community is our very strongest and most supportive,” Hertling said. “[We] know you understand us and have proven so through supporting us over so many tough missions.”

Hertling acknowledged that the Soldiers and Family Members, of the 170th IBCT and the German citizens Baumholder will keep the brigade’s legacy alive.

“As each year passes, fewer will know the demands placed on this brigade and community. Even fewer will know the phenomenal history you have all recorded,” Hertling said. “How you were tested and found victorious in combat. How you humbled you foes, gave hope to the desperate, focused on the dignity of a foreign people and remained true to our Army values and our national goals.”

“The people that formed the [170th IBCT] are our legacy. A legacy we can all be very proud of,” Hertling added.

For Staff Sgt. Robert Rivera, the brigade’s color bearer for the ceremony, being a part of the deactivation was a proud moment.

“[Unless the unit gets reactivated], there isn’t going to be anyone else carrying this guidon again,” said the 24th Brigade Support Battalion Soldier and New York native. “To have been the last person to actually hold the guidon and have them case it was a proud moment.”

In July of 2009, the 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, reflagged as the 170th IBCT. In early 2011, the 170th IBCT deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.
170th IBCT units currently in Baumholder include the 16th Sustainment Brigade, 421st Multifunctional Medical Battalion, 240th Quartermaster Support Company, 317th Maintenance Company, 51st Transportation Company, 557th Medical Company, and the 720th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company.

“Partnership with the local community is in good hands,” Raschke concluded. “You have made deployments a success, the deactivation seamless, and Baumholder a home.”


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